Thankfully, permit for US hunter to kill black rhino remains stalled

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The twisted claims that selling trophy hunts to kill rhinos will save rhinos are nothing more than excuses for individuals to gleefully show off their evidence that they’ve killed an endangered species.

The news about the auction held last January for the permit spread around the news and Internet sites. Hopefully, the negative blow back has helped to stall the permit from going through.

CNN’s update on the story notes the auction was sponsored by the Dallas Safari Club and that and the club and the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism claimed the funds raised would be donated to “conservation and anti-poaching efforts.”

A permit to transport the body parts – as so-called “trophies” – back to the United States. But the article reports some great news. Over 15,000 comments, opposing the permit, were received by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, within the 30-day comment period.

There are only an estimated 5,000 black rhinos left on the planet. Killing them to save them makes little sense. I know the claim is that only older members of the herd are selected for this sort of auction. And I noted the claim that they are no longer of value to the herd.

But these claims apparently come from people who actually put little value on the lives on animals. These rhinos are living, feeling animals who experience emotion and have the capacity to suffer.

And of course, the primary question to ask is this: If the mission is to save the rhinos, why not just donate the funds and travel there to photograph a rhino, rather than kill them?

Jeffrey Flocken said it best in the article:

“They need to be protected, not sold to the highest bidder,” said Jeffrey Flocken of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

“It’s a farce to say that this is being done for conservation,” Flocken said. “It’s saying the rarity of this animal is worth more dead than alive.”

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