Thankfully, permit for US hunter to kill black rhino remains stalled

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The twisted claims that selling trophy hunts to kill rhinos will save rhinos are nothing more than excuses for individuals to gleefully show off their evidence that they’ve killed an endangered species.

The news about the auction held last January for the permit spread around the news and Internet sites. Hopefully, the negative blow back has helped to stall the permit from going through.

CNN’s update on the story notes the auction was sponsored by the Dallas Safari Club and that and the club and the Namibian Ministry of Environment and Tourism claimed the funds raised would be donated to “conservation and anti-poaching efforts.”

A permit to transport the body parts – as so-called “trophies” – back to the United States. But the article reports some great news. Over 15,000 comments, opposing the permit, were received by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, within the 30-day comment period.

There are only an estimated 5,000 black rhinos left on the planet. Killing them to save them makes little sense. I know the claim is that only older members of the herd are selected for this sort of auction. And I noted the claim that they are no longer of value to the herd.

But these claims apparently come from people who actually put little value on the lives on animals. These rhinos are living, feeling animals who experience emotion and have the capacity to suffer.

And of course, the primary question to ask is this: If the mission is to save the rhinos, why not just donate the funds and travel there to photograph a rhino, rather than kill them?

Jeffrey Flocken said it best in the article:

“They need to be protected, not sold to the highest bidder,” said Jeffrey Flocken of the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

“It’s a farce to say that this is being done for conservation,” Flocken said. “It’s saying the rarity of this animal is worth more dead than alive.”

PACK MENTALITY BLOG: Compassion - teamed with Science and Logic

Born Free USA statement on auction to kill black rhino

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Born Free USA released a statement this afternoon concerning the auction for a permit to kill an endangered black rhino.

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Wildlife conservation leader is saddened by Namibia’s decision and calls for action to oppose any permit application to bring the “trophy” to the U.S.

Washington D.C., January 17, 2014 — Today, Adam Roberts, Executive Vice President of Born Free USA, a national leader in wildlife conservation and animal welfare, released this statement regarding the killing of a black rhino auction in Texas:

“Born Free USA is saddened by Namibia’s misguided and short-sighted decision to allow this black rhino hunt to take place.  More importantly we will be mobilizing our grassroots supporters nationwide to oppose any permit application to bring the ‘trophy’ back into America.”

He continued, “With fewer than 5,000 black rhinos left in the wild it is truly shocking that any hunter would consider it sporting to slaughter one. That’s not real conservation. Real conservation involves wildlife law enforcement, securing protected areas, and stopping illicit trade.  Funds to underwrite these vital, life-saving activities could be provided without carnage.”

“More than 1,000 rhinos were poached in South Africa alone in 2013 — the highest number in one year on record. The global conservation community and governments everywhere must speak with a unified voice to declare that any killing of any rhino is incompatible with conservation, and for a species as imperiled as the rhino, every animal’s life is significant,” Roberts said.

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PACK MENTALITY BLOG: Compassion - teamed with Science and Logic

Here’s the thing about the Dallas Safari Club auction

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The Dallas Safari Club is thankfully catching a lot of heat for auctioning off a permit to kill an African Black Rhino. The wild claim is that the auction is planned to help the conservation effort for rhinos.

If the Dallas Safari Club really cared about the rhinos, the club would hold an auction, call off the hunt and donate the money raised.

But in reality, it’s all about killing a rhino. The award here is for the winner to be able to go to parties and tell the story of how they killed an endangered species. You can bet photos of the hunter and hunted will be splashed around hunting social media.

Only about 5,000 black rhinos exist on the planet. They are critically endangered. But Ben Carter of the Dallas Safari Club claims it’s good for the species to kill older members of the herd, who he says, “are not contributing to the population anymore.”

This shows a complete lack of understanding of animals – on humane and scientific levels.

I have a suggestion. Why not offer huge reward for the capture of wildlife poachers in Africa. Then the hunters can really say they did something great.

PACK MENTALITY BLOG: Compassion - teamed with Science and Logic